Social proof trumps best logic

Peer pressure always wins.

Wilt Chamberlain – easily one of the best basketball players of all time – was a terrible free throw shooter. Except for one season when he changed technique and scored more free throws in one game than anyone ever has. Then, crazily, he gave up the technique. Malcolm Gladwell explains why we often make the wrong decisions, in full awareness that they’re wrong. This story was adapted from Gladwell’s new podcast Revisionist History, which is produced by Panoply. 

www.thisamericanlife.org/590/choosing-wrong

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Age fluidity 

Why not if you can just change your gender. 

This is probably fake but it’s amusing fakery. 

Not Emile Ratelband, a 69-year-old who feels like he’s in his 40s. The Dutch pensioner is asking a court in his hometown of Arnhem, southeast of Amsterdam, to change his birth certificate so that it says he took his first breath on March 11, 1969, rather than on March 11, 1949. 

www.thestar.com/news/world/2018/11/08/69-year-old-dutch-man-asks-to-be-declared-49-claiming-age-is-as-fluid-as-gender.html

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Forget population boom, how about crash

The most fertile group – Muslims – will win this race.

During the post-Second World War decades, global leaders and intellectuals were tortured with the prospect of a planet with too many people to feed, but now the industrialized world is challenged by too few babies and greying populations.

Source: Developed societies having too few babies for long-term survival | Toronto Sun

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The Family That Flees Together, Trees Together

Can a family that lives in the belly of the Beast be outside of the system? The answer is surprisingly yes.

This whole story began because of the war on marijuana. Well I am not an advocate for the use of it, I am pleased the Canada has made it legal, especially if they can avoid bizarre situations like this one. Go to the 20 minute mark if you want to hear an epic rant against the system and against out of control law enforcement.

The Jarvis family, a group of eight, goes on the run from the law—for seven years. They live on a boat, in a treehouse in a swamp. They escape capture time after time. And how do the kids turn out, living a life outside of society, as fugitives? Surprisingly great.

www.thisamericanlife.org/177/american-limbo/act-one

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